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Vivi Exercises for the Points of the Iron Pentacle

by valerie walker
©2005
parental advisory: contains sexual material

Here are a set of hands-on exercises for working with the points of the Iron Pentacle in ways that involve the Fetch directly and, hopefully, keep intellectualizing to a minimum.

Working With The Sex Point

You will need:
-- a piece of paper
-- a pen or pencil
-- a large mirror, big enough to see your entire body in
-- privacy


Sit cross-legged in front of the mirror, naked. Look at yourself as if you were looking at a stranger. Ask yourself, "Who is this person? What does s/he want sexually? What can I do for him/her?" Imagine yourself making love to the person in the mirror. See how real you can make the experience without actually touching yourself, just imagining the touch of your own hands on your skin, tenderly caressing yourself in imagination.

Feel the mental and emotional blockages that come into place as you attempt this. Don't fight them, just acknowledge them.

When you feel that you have acknowledged all the blocks and difficulties you are feeling about your sexuality, take the pen and paper and draw a self-portrait from your mirror image. It doesn't have to be a perfect likeness, or even a realistic portrait at all. Just try to capture your impression of your sexual self. Include the blocks and feelings as well. Do they sit over you like clouds? Do they pierce you like daggers? Are they solid or fragmented? Where in your body do you feel their effects? Put all this into your drawing. You may wish to color your work. Do so without thinking about its meaning or significance, just color as you might have done when you were a child. It's not even necessary to stay inside the lines, either.

Now sit in front of the mirror again and make love to yourself, all shame and fears forgotten.


Working With The Pride Point

Making a statue to yourself.
You will need:
-- Paper and pencils/pens in different colors
-- Modeling clay, Sculpy, or any easy-to-use sculpting material
-- Sculpting tools (available at http://www.diandolls.com/sculpting_supplies.htm or at any art supply store)


What kind of monument would you like? Draw it or sculpt a model of it: Do you want to be remembered as riding a horse or a dragon? Standing on a heap of conquered enemies? Being worshipped by others? Heroic or helpful? Being more beautiful, more athletic, more powerful physically than you actually are? Who's your action figure?

Making a movie of your life.
You will need:
-- Paper and pen/s
-- Music paper
-- Movie magazines to cut up
-- Blank CDs / CD recording capability on your computer
-- Costumes and props for fairytale enactments


Who would you pick to play you in the movie about your life? Find pictures of the actors you want and cut them out for a collage or paper dolls you can move around and play out your movie.

What songs would you have on your soundtrack? Make a CD of your playlist. Dance to it.

What would the plot be? Which fairy-tale would you have enacted as representing your life most closely? Are you feeling like Cinderella or the Brave Little Tailor? Jack and the Beanstalk? Vasilissa the Beautiful? Are you an Orphan, a Pirate, a Wizard, Baba Yaga, a Frog Prince, or the wounded Fisher King? Are you Lancelot, or Galahad? Are you Robin Hood? What is your connection with the stories you were told as a child, and which story resonates deepest within you and tells the truth about you? Dress as your character/s and play out your story as if you were on a stage.

Working With The Self Point

Make a life mask.
You will need:
-- Plaster-gauze, gauze bandaging impregnated with plaster of Paris. (One roll of 3-inch gauze should be enough for an adult face.)
-- Scissors, to cut the plaster-gauze into strips;
-- Bowl of water, to dip the gauze into before applying;
-- Vaseline, to coat the skin with before putting the gauze on;
-- Old towels or other cloths to use as drop-cloths and to drape your shoulders;
-- A mirror.


Cut the gauze into strips of one inch by two inches. Put some gauze aside to be cut up even smaller for detail work. If you have long hair, tie it back out of the way; then Vaseline your face liberally, paying particular attention to your eyebrows and other facial hair. Since you are making this mask on yourself rather than someone else, Vaseline around your eyes but don't do your eyelashes, as you will be leaving eyeholes.

(doing an entire head using the wrap method)

Dip the gauze pieces into the water and then apply them to your face, starting at the top and working your way around the perimeter. Be sure to smooth the pieces on your face with your fingers so that the plaster fills in the texture of the gauze. Fill in the face, leaving spaces for your nostrils and your eyes. You don't have to worry about making the eyeholes exactly the right shape, as you can trim the mask with a scissors when it's done. Use at least three layers of gauze all over the mask area. If you like, you can use more to build up areas such as cheekbones or nose, or simply to make the mask stronger.

When you are finished, sit quietly in front of the mirror and wait for the mask to dry. It should take perhaps 35-45 minutes, depending on how thick you have built it. When you are able to wiggle your features without the mask sticking to your face, it's dry enough to remove. It should come off easily. If it doesn't, leave it on longer until it does. This period of time can be used to meditate on who you are, and your way of being in the world, and whether it works as well as it could. Would you rather be someone else? What about them do you envy? Do you think anyone envies you?

You can dry the mask completely in an oven set at 125 degrees for about a half-hour. Once again, this may vary depending on how thickly built up the mask is. When you take it out of the oven, let it dry for another day or so. Trim it with sharp scissors, and then coat it with Elmer's glue, inside and out. When the glue dries, your mask is ready to paint or decorate.

Decorating the mask:
Do this as a ritual. You might want to do the decoration after you have gone through the entire Iron Pentacle and let your Vivi play with all the points in turn. Or alternatively, you can do it as part of your Power work.

Working With Your Power

Divination from the landscape
This is a variation on exercises recommended by Jan Fries in his excellent work, Visual Magick. I believe that Lon Milo Duquette also has a book about making divinatory tools from everyday objects, but what I'm talking about is actually taking random found objects and "reading" them like Tarot cards. Simply go for a walk and pick up stuff. What does it tell you?

Decorating your mask
You can paint your mask, glue fabric or beads, attach feathers, decoupage pictures, add three-dimensional elements made of clay or Sculpy to it-- use your imagination. If you have small magickal objects of significance, you might wish to attach them to the mask.To differentiate this from an ordinary arts-and-crafts project, cast a circle first, and find which of your powers are exemplified in each of these decorative additions. Which elements do you want to bring forth?

If you are ambitious, you can make a mask for each direction, to serve as your personal guardians, and decorate each as the element of your choice. Or they can be the seasons, or different deities.

Whatever you decide to do, do it with intent -- the intent that this mask should be the outward expression of your inner power.

Working With Your Passion

Your passion is that thing or those things you are passionate about. What are you really trying to say, to do, to accomplish? When you have discovered these things, this is the point at which you are perfectly poised to do operant Magick/ Spellcraft. Find the intent, then the method of your choice. The interface between Magick and Art is as close as the nearest set of tools to inspire and tweak your senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, or smell.

Specific spells
There are a series of Hex-spells originated by the late Jo Steen of Compost coven. I like to open these in Adobe Illustrator and fill them with colors, patterns, and gradients which feel appropriate at the moment for the task at hand. Jo always colored hers by hand, working clockwise.


(hex spell for insight, inspiration and creativity in the preparation of this class material)



-- Simple instructions for making a mojo were written by me back in the 1970's. Cat Yronwode's book on hoodoo and rootwork is online at http://www.luckymojo.com/hoodoo.html. This is an invaluable resource!



-- Sigil magick is also a fun thing to do electronically. Please note the interesting views of the chaos magick guys based on the work of A.O.Spare, in which you are recommended to put as much energy into the sigil as you can (usually sexual), and then forget completely about it in order to avoid "lust for results". (I rather like this approach, as I have a horrible memory and tend to forget everything if I haven't written it down.)

(sigil for Fotamecus, time compression/expansion servitor)

-- Magickal oils, candle magick, and herbal spells have an extensive literature -- if you don't have at least one book on the subject in your library, shame on you! Run, do not walk, to your closest bookstore. Or if you are lazy, simply Google.

-- Make an altar to the object of your passion. More about my particular altar-making practice can be found here and here. There are a number of good books on the subject, including
* Altars and Icons: Sacred Spaces in Everyday Life by Jean McMann (Editor)
* Altars Made Easy : A Complete Guide To Creating Your Own Sacred Space by Peg Streep
* In a Spiritual Style: The Home as Sanctuary by Laura Cerwinske
* A Book of Women's Altars: How to Create Sacred Spaces for Art, Worship, Solace, Celebration by Nancy Brady Cunningham
* Living Shrines: Home Altars of New Mexico by Marie Romero Cash
* Fearless Creating (Inner Workbook.) by Eric Maisel
and many more, most available at Amazon.com.